Click here to return to the Link2Lead Home Page
 
 
 
Google  
 
click to view Getting Started click to view My Self click to view My Community click to view My Congregation click to view My World  
&nbp;
&nbp;
 
 

l
 
l
 
 
l
2000 Current Population Survey:
Foreign Born Population
 
l
l l l
l

Coming to America

l
l l l
l
l l l
l Between 1820 and 1920, approximately 34 million persons immigrated to the United States, three-fourths of them staying permanently. By 1920, 15% of the U.S. population was foreign-born. Five decades later however, the "poor, tired and huddled masses" were no longer amassing at Lady Liberty's feet in record numbers. By 1970 (due first to World War I and then to restrictive immigration legislation), the numbers of foreign born had declined significantly, falling to a record low of just 5% of the overall population. l
  As of the latest population survey in March 2000, the numbers of foreign-born have risen dramatically-from 9.6 million in 1970 to 28.4 million in 2000, effectively tripling the immigrant population. If you combine those numbers with the first-generation U.S. residents, then you have the highest combined number—56 million, or a ratio of 1-in-5 of the U.S. population is either a foreign-born or first-generation resident. The foreign-born segment alone represents roughly 10 percent of the U.S. population—the highest rate since 1930. -JK  
     
l
ll ll ll
l

Foreign-Born Population
Source: US Census Bureau; March 2000 Current Population Survey

  1910 1930 1970 2000
Foreign-Born 13.5 14.2 9.6 28.4
Foreign Stock 18.9 26.0 24.0 27.5
Total 32.4 40.2 33.6 55.9
(Population in Millions)
l
l   l
l Ministry Ideas l
     
 
Consider the racial/ethnic profile of your congregation. While your church may not be located in a top area of foreign-born growth (primarily West and Southwest), most every state has experienced an increase in the number of foreign-born residents.
 
 
l What are the implications of this trend for your church? Do your services and programs reflect the changing face of America?
Imagine yourself as a foreign-born person and try to see your country, your community and finally your church the way he or she might perceive it. What might be some of the cultural differences that could unknowingly erect barriers to communication?
l Without sacrificing your church's own religious tenets, consider tangible ways your congregation might learn to "be all things to all men" in order to reach the foreign-born in your community with the Gospel.
 
     
l l
l ©  COPYRIGHT 2008 PERCEPT GROUP, INC. l
l l l
For a more printable version of this page, click here.