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Census 2000:
The Asian Population - Part I
 
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The Asian Equation

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  One out of every 24 people in the United States is Asian. The Asian population in the United States has now reached 11.9 million people, or 4.2 percent of the total population. However, unlike the 1990 census, this time the category "Asians" included people who reported themselves to be either Asian alone, or Asian in combination with one or more other races.  
  Whether you use the race "alone" or "in combination" comparison, the Asian population still increased faster than the total population between 1990 and 2000. In 1990 there were 6.9 million Asians. Using just Asians alone that number increased by 3.3 million, or 49 percent. If you combine Asian alone with the in combination population, an increase of 5.0 million, or 72 percent results. Thus, from 1990 to 2000, the range for the increase in the Asian population was somewhere between 48 percent and 72 percent! In comparison, the total population grew by 13 percent, from 248.7 million in 1990 to 281.4 million in 2000. -JK  
  Next Month: Which is largest subgroup of the Asian population?
In July we'll examine the American Asian population in more demographic detail.
 
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United States Asian Population: 1990 and 2000
Source: US Census Bureau; Census 2000

POPULATION 1990 2000 % TOTAL US POP.
Asian 6.9 NA 2.8
Asian Alone NA 10.2 3.6
Asian In Combination NA 1.7 .6
Asian Alone or In Combination NA 11.9 4.2
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l Ministry Ideas l
     
 
Consider the racial/ethnic makeup of your congregation and your community. Are any Asian ethnicities represented? The bridge to racial/ethnic ministry is built upon an understanding and respect for the culture. . .
 
 
l Consider the "Asian alone or in combination" factor—a new quantitative distinction in the US Census. It brings up the issue of mixed races and how people perceive themselves racially. If, for example, one is half Caucasian and half Korean how might that affect their concept of themselves and their world?
How would Asian immigrants differ from their native born Asian-American children? Do you think older generations have succeeded in passing on their religious beliefs to their children and if so, how might the American experience have changed or even diluted some of those beliefs?
Perhaps more than some other ethnic groups, Asian immigrants may tend to stay within their own circles, not assimilating as easily with other cultures. What might be some of the reasons for this? Cultivating a relationship with one or more persons may help you gain a better understanding of their culture.
 
     
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