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Census 2000:
The Asian Population - Part II
 
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Dividing Asian Diversity

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  The largest subgroup of Asians in the United States is Chinese, accounting for 23 percent, or 2.7 million of the total 11.9 million Asian population. This is true for both the Asian alone and the in combination populations (see previous QuickInsight for explanation). Running a close second is the Filipino population—either alone, or in combination with another race. They account for 2.4 million, or 20 percent of the total Asian population. Asian Indians are third with 1.9 million. Interestingly, of the six largest specified Asian groups the Japanese were most likely to report as being a mix of one or more other races or Asian groups. Thirty-one percent (31%) reported as being of a mixed race or in combination with another Asian group. Vietnamese were the least likely of the six largest Asian groups to be of either a mixed race or in combination with another Asian group, at 8.3% or their total population. -JK  
  Fast Fact: Foreign-born Asians are better educated than most other foreign-born groups. The proportion of people 25 years or older who were born in Asia and have a high school education or higher is 84% compared to only 67% of foreign-born groups other than Asian who have a high school education or higher.  
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Asian Population by Detailed Group*
*Groups with 1 million or more (including Asian alone or in any combination)
Source: US Census Bureau; Census 2000

POPULATION 2000 % ASIAN POP % US POP
Chinese 2.7 22.68% 0.96%
Filipino 2.4 20.17% 0.85%
Asian Indian 1.9 15.96% 0.67%
Vietnamese 1.2 10.08% 0.43%
Korean 1.2 10.08% 0.43%
Japanese 1.1 9.24% 0.39%
All Others Reported 1.4 11.76% 0.49%
Asian Alone or In Combination 11.9 100.00% 4.23%
NUMBERS IN MILLIONS
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l Ministry Ideas l
     
 
Consider the racial/ethnic makeup of your congregation and your community. Are any Asian ethnicities represented? The bridge to racial/ethnic ministry is built upon an understanding and respect for the culture. . .
 
 
l How much understanding do you have of the Asian culture overall and in particular, the specific group or groups they may represent? For example, what might be some of the cultural and religious differences between a Chinese-American and a Korean-American? How might failing to understand those differences cause an unintentional barrier in communication?
Think of ways that you can educate yourself and your congregation about these differences. Consider having an ethnic dinner night with the express purpose of getting to know the various Asian sub-groups within your community.
 
     
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