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Census 2000:
American Indian and
Alaska Native Population
 
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Indigenous Diversity

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Census 2000 counted more than 4 million people who said they were American Indian or Alaska Native, either alone or in combination with one or more other races. Of the total United States population, 2.5 million people, or nearly one percent, reported only American Indian or Alaska Native (not in combination with another race). This population grew at least 26 percent since 1990, twice the growth rate of the total U.S. population! Nearly half live in the West (43%), a third in the South (31%), seventeen percent (17%) in the Midwest and nine percent (9%) in the Northeast. States with the largest American Indian and Alaska Native populations are, in order of highest to lowest, California, Oklahoma, Arizona, Texas, New Mexico, New York, Washington, North Carolina, Michigan, Alaska and Florida. Of the more than 700 tribal affiliations reported in Census 2000, the largest tribes are Cherokee, Navajo, Choctaw, Sioux and Chippewa.
 
 
NOTE* November is American Indian and Alaska Native Heritage Month—a time to honor the role "First Nation" peoples have played in the history and progress of the United States. Across the country, special events will celebrate the culture of the original people of the land and discuss the problems they face.
 
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American Indian and Alaska Native Population
Source: Census 2000, U.S. Census Bureau; To download the report, The American Indian
and Alaska Native Population: 2000 in PDF format, click here
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Percentage of Population by State


American Indian Tribal Affiliation
Six Largest Tribal Groupings (over 100,000)
of those reporting Tribal affiliation*
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* 75% indicated a tribal affiliation in Census 2000.
Over 700 Tribal affiliations were reported.
Click here for the complete list
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l Ministry Ideas l
     
 
Consider your relationship with and attitude towards Native people in your community. Is there a role for your church to play toward healing and reconciliation, ministry partnership with Native American Christians, or missionary support?
 
 
l Increase your understanding of Native American perspectives concerning European American's past and present missionary approaches. Read Chapter 3 from Whiteman's Gospel by Craig Smith, a Chippewa leader in the Christian & Missionary Alliance.
l "Less than 5% of Native people have a vital relationship with Christ. Many of our people suffer an alcoholism rate 10 times that of all other ethnic groups in the U.S. combined, teen suicide six times the national average, highest rates of unemployment in the land, severe economic hardships, and an average life expectancy for Native men of 47." (Richard Twiss, Rosebud/Lakota Sioux Tribe, President, Wiconi International (http://www.wiconi.com). Consider supporting the contextualized mission and ministry efforts of Native Christians among their own people. Download the PDF document, A conversation with Richard Twiss from the Center for World Missions.
If there is a Native American population in your area, consider a proactive ministry of reconciliation. Begin by reading One Church, Many Tribes by Richard Twiss, or Living in Color by Rev. Randy Woodley, a Keetowah Cherokee and leader in the American Baptist Church. (http://www.eagles-wingsmin.com/directory).
 
     
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