Click here to return to the Link2Lead Home Page
 
 
 
Google  
 
click to view Getting Started click to view My Self click to view My Community click to view My Congregation click to view My World  
&nbp;
&nbp;
 
 

 
 
l
 
l
10 Facts Series:
Current Population (Basic Fact 1)
 
l
l   l
l
  And Counting  
  The addition of 32.7 million people from 1990 to 2000 represented the largest population increase for any decade in U.S. history. A record number of immigrations accounted for 40 percent of the total growth (13.2 million). By the time you say, "The current U.S. population is 300 million*," another birth changes the total. There is approximately one birth every 8 seconds, one death every 12 seconds, and one new international migrant every 25 seconds (net). When you combine these factors, one person is added to our population about every 12 seconds—7,200 per day! To display this incredible change, the Census Bureau's "population clock" has been included below. If you refresh this page, or return to it later, the population will have changed to reflect the estimated increase.  
  100 YEARS OF COUNTING: The U.S. population is roughly 4 times what it was in 1900 (76 million). How does the number of persons per household compare to 1900? There are now about 2.6 people per household compared to 4.6 people per household in 1900. One-person households were scarce in 1900, at just 5% of the total—in 2000 they were quite common, at one out of every four households. The rate of housing unit development outpaced population growth during the last century by 2 to 1. As you would expect, the population density—or, number of persons per square mile—is increasing dramatically as well. In 1900 it was 26, in 1990 it was 66, and the current population density is roughly 80 people per square mile...and counting.  
  *NOTE: When you review your 10 Basic Facts report, or any of Percept's other demographic reports, the 2006 (or Current Population) figure is based upon the most recent annual data update.  
     
l
ll ll ll
l

United States Population
Sources: US Census Bureau, Census 2000;
Census Report: Demographic Trends in the 20th-Century

2000 U.S. CENSUS BUREAU
POPULATION CLOCK
U.S. POPClock
100 YEAR RATE OF POPULATION
CHANGE BY STATE
TOP 5 STATES BY 100 YEAR RATE OF POPULATION CHANGE (IN MILLIONS)
--Population increased atleast 10 times-
STATE 1900 POP 2000 POP % CHANGE
Nevada 42,335 1,998,257 4620%
Arizona 122,931 5,130,632 4074%
Florida 528,542 15,982,378 2924%
California 1,485,053 33,871,648 2181%
Washington 518,103 5,894,121 1038%
BOTTOM 5 STATES BY 100 YEAR RATE OF POPULATION CHANGE (IN MILLIONS)
--Population less than doubled--
STATE 1900 POP 2000 POP % CHANGE
Iowa 2,231,853 2,926,324 31%
Nebraska 1,066,300 1,711,263 60%
Vermont 343,641 608,827 77%
Missouri 3,106,665 5,595,211 80%
Mississippi 1,551,270 2,844,658 83%
l
   
 
Ministry Reflection Questions
 
 
Review BASIC FACT 1 from the 10 Basic Facts report for your ZIP Code or the combined ZIP Codes that make up your ministry area. Click on the logo to get your 10 Facts.
Click here to produce a 10 Facts report for your ZIP Code
 
 
l The size of your Population has the most fundamental impact upon your church's ministry. As you reflect upon the population of your ministry area what occurs to you? What are the causes that have affected your population over the last 10, 20 or 30 years?
What percentage of the population attends your church? How has this changed over time? What kind of community was your church conceived for?
l Living and ministrying in Nevada or Arizona over the last century— where there is now more than 40 people for every one person in 1900—would have been much different than doing so in Iowa or Nebraska, where the population has not really changed much during the same period. Whether you live in an area of dynamic growth or relative stability, does your church attendance history reflect the population change in your ministry area? What might be the cause?
 
     
l l
l ©  COPYRIGHT 2008 PERCEPT GROUP, INC. l
l l l
For a more printable version of this page, click here.